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It generally has very clean lines, and has a sort of compelling aesthetic to it which honestly can make a person fall in love with it

I don’t remember exactly how much I paid in NZD, but it was between $150.00 to $180.00 with shipping included. The second lot of jute I purchased (200 metres, 8 mm) cost a lot more, but I was treating myself to a “savings milestone” so I’m not too upset. It’s a synthetic bondage rope; this means it has a very different level of tooth than the cotton rope or a natural fibre. It’s very smooth, with almost no tooth, which means a lot less friction, making it a slicker, faster rope. It’s easily accessible; cheaper than most bondage ropes, it has decent tooth (essentially, friction; what holds your knots and stuff together), it’s washable, and it’s decently strong. It is possible to dye it. You can carry a lot of it around with you. It’s not hugely expensive. Approximately 100 metres left of my Precious. Again, when washed, boiled etc it tends to degrade.

I can’t give you as thorough a break down on it, but I made some observations. Nylon at Bunnings. Again, not recommended for shibari, but everything else goes, and I’ve heard that there are actually dyes which will change the colour of nylon. As I’ve only ever seen it in white, that means you should get a good result if you decide to go down that route. I got my first set of five millimeter jute from Jade Rope (fairly large set, about 80 metres) for about $113.00 Australian dollars before shipping. I don’t remember exactly how much I paid in NZD, but it was between $150.00 to $180.00 with shipping included.

And tastes and priorities may change, which is cool. Mine certainly have: I went from feeling “so-so” about hemp to loving it, just by getting a different supplier. Nowhere near as pricey as the better natural fibre ropes, but it’s further up there than the previously mentioned ropes. The same goes for this as the other synthetic ropes with regards to friction; you will need to use knots. This has multiple advantages; it spreads any pressure from the tie over a wider surface, and it doesn’t catch on things when you’re rolling around, struggling, what have you. You need fewer wraps to get a safe distribution of pressure. “Natural Fiber” Ropes:. Hemp, Jute, Sisal, Cotton, Coconut.

Which is basically incredibly soft and smooth, but with enough solidity and weight to it to give it a real feeling of authority when you put it around someone’s wrists, legs, what have you. It feels basically like nylon rope, but is nowhere near as pricey. I recommend rope of 5 millimeters or above for safety reasons. I generally get rope of 5 or 6 millimeters in diameter. There’s also a greater likelihood of surface abrasion and friction burn if you move it really quickly or with great pressure. Summary:.

I wouldn’t use this stuff for bondage at all with the core intact. It’s just stiff and cumbersome and not fun. It is by far the cheapest useful rope I’ve ever come across. Pros:. So if you’re going to use it, keep those EMT shears handy. (On the plus side, it’s not expensive to replace when you do cut it.). I wouldn’t use this stuff for bondage at all with the core intact. It’s just stiff and cumbersome and not fun. Nylon, MFP (multi-fiber propylene), “Mixed Fiber” Rope, Poly-pro, Parachute cord. Pro: Better “tooth”, so it grabs better and takes fewer knots to hold securely.